Singapore's corporate governance coup

A new directive on auditors has given the rest of the world something to think about.

Small is nimble, and this is one quality Singapore has in abundance.

While the rest of the world flails around post-Enron to conceive measures to improve corporate governance, Singapore, as ever, has taken the simple, direct, route-one approach.

It doesn't take a genius to work out that relationships become more cosy over time. In auditing this is as true as in any other part of the business world. So Singapore's MAS has now ruled that the city state's three major banks must rotate their auditors every five years - and must make their next change before 2006.

This is eminently sensible. Why Well, if you know you are only going to be auditing a company...

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